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Px3 Delivers a Second “World First” with a Free Public Sector Carbon Footprint Tool

New procurement tool launched at Google’s Earth Day event creates a level playing field for carbon footprint analysis

Not many people or organisations manage a world first.  Justin Sutton-Parker of Px3 managed one when he proved it was possible to meaningfully quantify the energy used by a computing device “in real life”. The calculations were based on his PhD research with Warwick University and Warwick Business School which included lab-testing and calibrating a wide range of devices, operating systems and form factors.

That published research has now been used by Px3 in calculating the Scope 2 (energy used in operation) carbon footprint of over one million PCs and laptops across 164 different countries for organisations ranging from huge central government departments and multi-national companies to universities and charities.

So much for Scope 2, but what about Scope 3 (embodied emissions from manufacture, distribution, packaging and disposal)?  Calculating and comparing this additional class of emissions has long been a troublesome issue as manufacturers can use different methods and metrics to calculate their footprint and make very different assumptions about how (and for how many years) the device will be used.

This hasn’t been much of an issue for most organisations as statutory reporting has not been extended to Scope 3 emissions, but there is an increasing realisation that if we are going to take the sustainability issue seriously, Scope 3 has to be included in the action plan.

So not satisfied with having created the rules for calculating Scope 2 emissions for IT, Justin commenced an investigation into resolving the IT issues around Scope 3.

The result, launched during the keynote session of Google’s Earth Day event on the 26th April 2022, is a tool that allows decision makes to compare the total carbon footprint of end user computing devices from a  wide-range of the market-leading manufacturers.

Importantly, the tool is 100% independent and uses only the published data from the manufacturers themselves.  The crucial difference (and therefore Px3’s “second world first”), is that the data is processed using the algorithms designed by Justin to match an individual profile set by the viewer.  As an example, if the organisation plans to use the device for five years and mostly operates out of the Nordics, these factors can be applied and the data adjusts accordingly.

Equally, if the organisation requires a particular EPEAT rating, form factor or screen size, these can be applied as filters to ensure that the devices shown are fit for purpose.

Ultimately, the tool is designed to help IT procurement teams create a short-list of devices that meet their selection criteria with a focus on selecting the ones which have the lowest total carbon footprint.

Px3 has already demonstrated the benefits of including Scope 3 analysis in its consulting work, with excellent feedback from customers, including Kari Anna Fiskvik, Vice President Technology at Nordic Choice Hotels who commented “In order to identify the company’s actual emissions, you need to dig in to the details of your scope 3 contributions, and IT-equipment and electronics are a surprisingly large part of those.  The report from Px3 has really helped us get a more detailed understanding of that data and put it into context. “

Perhaps most importantly, Px3 has decided to make access to the tool free of charge for procurement teams in the public and not for profit sectors.

Commenting on the decision, CIO Ewen Anderson said “We are on a mission to remove emissions equivalent to 100,000 cars per annum from the atmosphere by 2050.  The best way to achieve that is to get Justin’s research and this tool into as many organisations as possible, starting with the public sector.  This tool creates a level playing field for the first time and I can’t wait to see it in use.”

The first group of users are already live on the system and between them represent nearly half a million IT users across central and local government.

For more information on this and carbon footprint assessments from Px3 please use the Contact Us form…

Sustainability: Science for Change vs Greenwash

How greenwash, politics, fake news and all manner of distractions have a corrosive effect on genuine attempts to drive change.

“It’s the economy, stupid” was a phrase used by James Carville, a strategist in Bill Clinton’s 1992 presidential campaign, intended to keep the campaign’s workers’ focus on a simple, controlled message.  It worked and the phrase entered political and marketing textbooks.

Today we could try to focus minds on the issue of climate change with a phrase like “it’s sustainability, stupid” but it is less likely to be so readily adopted, as the world has fortunately become a rather kinder place, at least linguistically.  If we take a look at the origins of the word, however, we might get a different perspective.

Enter the Stupidus….

A “stupidus” was a mimic playing a role in the classical Roman theatre, along with the scurra (giving us scurrilous) and moriones (moron).  The stupidus (also known as a “parasitus” – one who eats from another’s table) was a masked comic who would copy the lead actor but spice up the performance with obscene gestures and language to distract and amuse the audience.  

And here we have the issue.

The science around sustainability should be the main event, whether that’s the facts around global heating as a critical issue, the contribution of various factors like fossil fuels or the need for transparent progress tracking and carbon accounting.  The underlying science should be clear, tested, peer-reviewed, professional and rigorous.  Because if it is then anyone presented with the resulting facts should react accordingly, right? 

However, like the Romans, we have the stupidus distracting us from the genuine content.

Peering Behind the Greenwash

At a recent supplier event I toured the sponsor exhibition hall and spotted multiple stands displaying “green” claims.  Some featured bland “protect the planet” statements, others proudly displayed a sub-set of the UN SDG logos.  None of the otherwise perfectly capable personnel on the stands could explain what actual, practical and measurable environmental benefit their products and services delivered, although reduced paper use and printing was the most credible (if still rather tenuous) response. 

To any claims of benefits, I asked my simple science question – “Have you actually measured the carbon footprint of the whole process, including all its component elements, before and after?  Because if not, you might have actually made things worse…..”.  This was met with a mixture of confusion and polite dismissal.  “Of course not – does anyone actually do that?” 

This is the very essence of poisonous, content-free greenwash.

And Then There’s Politics

Another prime case where we see stupidus plying their distractive trade is politics.  Naively we would expect our policy makers and leaders to be considering what is best at least for our countries, if not for the wider world.

The rise of populist politicians has encouraged the dissemination of fake news and environmental scepticism in favour of short-term economic benefits.

To add to a veritable plague of short-term thinking we’ve also seen economic pressures and energy concerns cause more and more countries to question their commitments to reductions in the use of fossil fuels and consequently  the SDG goals and climate pledges.

The current competition to become UK Prime Minister is a case in point, with all the candidates at one point seeming to appeal to a right-wing sub-section of the electorate with promises to abandon Net Zero targets and roll-back on “green” levies and taxes. Fortunately those positions were reversed, but the threat remains.

We saw a brief glimmer of positivity regarding science during the pandemic when actual scientists took centre stage both in terms of public briefings and the race to develop and deliver vaccines at unprecedented speed.

All too quickly though, the principled environmental message (that we can and should lead the way on promoting sustainable practices and technology) is being sacrificed in favour of short-term political ambition through a very obvious pitch to the baser instincts of the audience, while our nightly news reports are filled with record temperatures, drought and floods.

Countering the Negative Impacts

Now it’s debatable which is worse;  the corrosive long-term impact of greenwash, the delays created by short-term political thinking, the shadowy influence of political lobbying on behalf of the fossil fuel industry or poison introduced by fake science and news discrediting the genuine content. 

Ultimately the main issue is that the genuine science and informed opinion become obscured, diluted or just lost in a fog of false claims and vested self-interest.

What’s needed is genuine, independent science-based metrics which can be held up to any external scrutiny.  From an organisational perspective we’ve seen the emergence of a number of projects and certifications (Ecovadis, CDP and Science Based Targets are examples).  

The more these genuine, transparent and objective metrics can be used, the stronger the urge for action through investment groups and ESG will be.  Where objective metrics take centre stage it’s hard for the stupidus to distract us.

Building a Science and Research-Based Business

At Px3 we’re lucky enough to have a research scientist as our CEO.  Not only that, we have one who has dedicated his time, research and indeed his career to understanding and promoting the sustainability of information technology.  That makes our product development and marketing very clear in terms of its focus and honesty.

Not all company lines are as easily drawn and I fully appreciate the temptation to start grabbing for green tag lines to boost marketing campaigns, but be assured – there’s no USP or customer loyalty in greenwash.

What our customers want from us is typically something significantly more substantial – independent, science-based metrics for decision making around ICT.  This is particularly true as organisations start to look beyond the initial Scope 2 (energy  consumed) and into Scope 3 (embodied carbon, travel, commuting and supply chain).  So that combined view is what we spend our time investigating and creating.

The process of calculating the consolidated ICT baseline, then mapping the “hotspots” (places, devices, roles or functions) and mapping out what an alternative near-future could look like, illustrated above, is both eye-opening and deeply satisfying.

Conclusion

Ultimately we judge our success as a business by the difference we make to (and through) our customers in terms of emissions reduction.

We’re not in any way suggesting that sustainability is the only metric for decision-making, or even the most important one, yet, for most organisations.  Only that it should be up there along with cost and risk (which includes security and reliability) and linked to user experience.

So our use and promotion of science and research is specifically to cut through the performance of the stupidus and instead present a very clear and easily understood set of metrics that change behaviours.  Because that’s what science should achieve. For more information on how Px3 use science to drive genuine improvements in sustainability  please visit or main site or contact us to find out more.

About the Author: Ewen Anderson BSc, MMS (Dip), CIO @ Px3

Ewen is CIO of Px3, a company on a mission to help organisations balance people, planet and productivity by promoting sustainable IT strategies.  Px3 has set itself the goal of removing the CO2 emissions equivalent of 100,000 cars from our atmosphere by 2050. With a background in psychology, management services, consultancy and enterprise IT, Ewen is a passionate believer that the right technology used in the right way can significantly reduce environmental impacts, engage users and improve productivity.

Ewen (LinkedIn Profile) can be contacted at ewen@px3.org.uk

Why Exemplars & Agency are Key to Sustainability

Market research indicates a huge majority of decision makers are concerned about the impacts of climate change, but are less confident about their actual carbon reduction plans….

There’s a cartoon I’ve seen a number of times on social media contrasting the huge number of people voting FOR change with the lack of people actually willing TO change.  The fact is that while we are very adaptable as a species, this is most often as a response to some external factor or crisis rather than a spontaneous evolution.

There are multiple blockers to change, some of which we identify below, but many of us have an instinctive objection along the lines of “not me”, “not that” or “not just now” which must be overcome.  When faced with something that the majority recognise as an existential crisis (such as war, famine, pandemic, fire or flood) our behaviours are much quicker to adapt.

The problem we face is that while the climate emergency is now mostly accepted as a genuine existential threat, it has a very different priority level currently depending on your location, prosperity, industry and security (in its widest context).

Our view on what we should do is affected by our “investments”, legacy, perceived responsibilities and, perhaps most importantly, our world view.

In figure 1 below we’ve set out the factors that typically block individuals and organisations from taking actual steps to minimise their climate impact, together with their typical impacts. 

In figure 2 we look at how these “blockers” can be reversed, using exemplars to demonstrate and build confidence in what is possible and establishing “agency” at all levels to encourage genuine momentum for change.

This is one of the reasons we invest so much of our time in working with major technology customers.  They have the reach, the funds and the customers to encourage and celebrate exemplars.  They have the profile to establish confidence in agency and the potential for change. They may even act as exemplars themselves, given ongoing investments in sustainable energy and improvements in reporting and transparency.

There are many changes we can promote to improve sustainability.  We can retain our devices for longer, use more energy-efficient devices and cloud services, repurpose more and discard less, travel less, store less and share much more efficiently.

This does not require expensive investments, increased complexity or reduced user experience.  Quite the opposite – sustainable IT can cut complexity, costs and carbon emissions.  So why wouldn’t every organisation consider sustainability as a key factor in their selection criteria?

From our perspective we have a deep respect for using science to drive better information, strategies, decisions and outcomes.  We believe that if organisations are given better data they will naturally make better decisions.  That’s why we build the toolsets, calculators and models.  It’s also why we make some of them are available free of charge to public sector and not-for-profit organisations.   

Ultimately, we believe that the blockers in fig 1 can (and must) be replaced with enablers in fig 2.For more information on how Px3 can help build agency and drive change please contact us to discuss.

About the Author: Ewen Anderson BSc, MMS (Dip), CIO @ Px3

Ewen is CIO of Px3, a company on a mission to help organisations balance people, planet and productivity by promoting sustainable IT strategies.  Px3 has set itself the goal of removing the CO2 emissions equivalent of 100,000 cars from our atmosphere by 2050. With a background in psychology, management services, consultancy and enterprise IT, Ewen is a passionate believer that the right technology used in the right way can significantly reduce environmental impacts, engage users and improve productivity.

Ewen (LinkedIn Profile) can be contacted at ewen@px3.org.uk

Breaking a Vicious Cycle

Why We Need to Escape the Upgrade “Treadmill”

Setting up my first IT consulting business over twenty five years ago a competitor asked me “why are you starting a new business based on legacy technology?” Somewhat confused I asked which technology he was referring to and he replied “Windows – it’s obsolete, because everything will be in a browser in five years time.”

Like many predictions for the IT industry this one proved almost 100% incorrect. Windows persists (and we’re even back to discussing mass-upgrades) and the browser became just another set of applications that needed to be managed and updated.

In the 90’s and early 21st century, however, upgrades were just an ICT problem – a necessary complexity that introduced risk and consumed time and budget. Of course the whole industry was based on consumption, with “line of business” software driving operating system and hardware sales and both requiring maintenance, support and managed services.

In 2022 most organisations are becoming aware that this “consumption” model has wider environmental implications and that the business as usual model of mass upgrades every four years is not compatible with ambitions to achieve Net Zero.

The ICT Emissions Issue

Most sustainability compliance and reporting is currently focussed on Scope 1 and 2 emissions – broadly the generation of power and heat, the use of company vehicles and the operational use of energy by the organisation.

Research (*J. Sutton-Parker. 2020, ‘Determining end user computing device Scope 2 GHG emissions with accurate use phase energy consumption measurement.’ For the 10th International Conference on Sustainable Energy Information Technology, Leuven, Belgium. Elsevier B.V., Science Direct. © Justin Sutton-Parker 2020) has shown that ICT is a significant contributor to emissions, with end user computing (EUC) devices alone generating 1% of all global GHG emissions through the manufacturing of 460 million devices p.a. and the associated energy consumed by 4.2bn active users.

Finding accurate information on energy-efficiency is challenging enough, but Scope 3 emissions (supply chain and commuting) is a much broader and complex topic to address. This is a particular issue for EUC devices, where the calculation of “embodied” emissions is not consistent between vendors and not available at all from many.

As the requirement to tackle the climate emergency becomes a higher priority and more immediate concern, organisations need to take a serious look at how to reduce both Scope 2 and 3 emissions and that means breaking the business as usual upgrade cycle. Below I’ve set out some actions and options that can help.

Action Point 1: Get Better Informed About Where You Are Today & Your Options for Tomorrow

Effective plans require a starting point, defined stages and an end-goal, so baselining your current estate to understand its profile, age and emissions is an important first step. With this information available you can start to look at options for the future.

As a starting point, consider the points set out in Action 2 below to determine how to make the most of what you already have. When it is finally time for a replacement device, make sure you factor total carbon footprint (Scope 2 and 3) into your decision-making criteria, alongside functionality and cost.

In order to identify the company’s actual emissions, you need to dig in to the details of your scope 3 contributions, and IT-equipment and electronics are a surprisingly large part of those. The report from Px3 has really helped us get a more detailed understanding of that data and put it into context.”
Kari Anna Fiskvik, Vice President Technology, Nordic Choice Hospitality Group

Px3 provides a range of analytical and benchmarking services including our Dynamic Carbon Footprint tool (available free of charge to public and third sector organisations) which can help you to evaluate the choices available.

Action Point 2: Ensure Devices “Live” Longer

Reducing the consumption (and therefore manufacture) of new devices and disposal (and resulting e-waste) of unwanted ones is an important way to improve IT sustainability and reduce the use of energy and resources. There are now lots of ways to extend the useful life of devices and these range from the simple to the highly complex depending on your circumstances, but broadly summarised (non-exclusive and in no particular order!) they are:

  • Re-deploy: use the device elsewhere / for someone else in the same organisation
  • Re-provision: switch O/S to low-resource, low-energy alternatives such as Igel OS or Chrome OS Flex
  • Move to Cloud Services: remove dependency on local software if you can switch to 100% SaaS apps
  • Use Virtual Workspaces, Apps and Desktops: move existing workloads to virtual environments
  • Invest in Upgradeable Devices: choose to buy devices that make future upgrades simple
  • Invest in Recycled & Upgraded Devices: choose to buy pre-owned, refurbished devices
  • Re-Purpose externally: when no longer usable, re-deploy the device for social value

Which combination of these is right for your organisation requires discussion and consideration of the potential costs and benefits from a financial and operational benefits perspective as well as an environmental one.

Focussing on sustainable IT, however, is ultimately likely to be worthwhile as recent published research by Justin Sutton-Parker indicates these actions can deliver Scope 2 energy savings of between 18% and 43% per annum and achieve Scope 3 emissions savings of 60%.

The research contains a wealth of information about the options, methodology, facts and the science behind the headlines and is recommended reading. It is the detail behind this research data, combined with the baseline data identified in Action Point 1, that we use to model “before and after” in our reports.

Action Point 3: Make “Reduce” the Key Strategy for 2022 and Beyond

One question I get asked regularly is “does all this really matter in terms of the big picture?”. The answer is emphatically “yes”. We need successes. We need exemplars. We have multiple examples where organisations have reduced their annual emissions significantly using one or more of the above measures because that is how we build momentum for change. Every kWh not being consumed is a kWh that does not need to be generated and does not create emissions. Every resource left in the ground is one that has not been extracted, has not been processed, has not been transported and will not be disposed of.

Starting today every organisation needs to adopt a strategy based around eliminating unnecessary energy and resource consumption and waste – and this includes ICT as a priority.

Setting the Net Zero targets we need to adopt to tackle climate change will require ICT to support new ways of working, productivity and innovation, but that must not give it “carte blanche” to be part of the problem. In the words of our CEO and research director, “Great IT can be green IT and green IT can be great IT”.

Conclusion

With sustainability rising in importance at board level in most organisations this is the time when IT can step out of the backroom and become an enabler of the new “green” era, but to do so it has to mature from a model based on consumption to one of conservation.

By arming themselves with information and options, customers have the power to demand that every IT company, from device manufacturers to resellers to cloud providers, make sustainability a priority and make access to the the sustainability data for their products and services simple and transparent.

That way IT becomes a bigger part of the solution and a smaller part of the problem.

If you’re interested in finding out more, simply contact us to discuss.

About the Author: Ewen Anderson BSc, MMS (Dip), CIO @ Px3

Ewen is CIO of Px3, a company on a mission to help organisations balance people, planet and productivity by promoting sustainable IT strategies.  Px3 has set itself the goal of removing the CO2 emissions equivalent of 100,000 cars from our atmosphere by 2050. With a background in psychology, management services, consultancy and enterprise IT, Ewen is a passionate believer that the right technology used in the right way can significantly reduce environmental impacts, engage users and improve productivity.

Ewen (LinkedIn Profile) can be contacted at ewen@px3.org.uk

Examining The Real Impacts of Sustainable IT – Px3’s CEO guest edits The Guardian’s My Green Pod Supplement for COP 26

One year on from the last “Time I.T. Changed” special issue, Justin Sutton-Parker of Px3 reviews both the progress and plans for the future to make IT more sustainable. From manufacturing and use to abatement strategies such as device longevity, remote working and offset programmes, the supplement draws on opinion and practical examples from some of the world’s largest and most innovative companies.

Featuring articles from Px3’s key technology customers and partners including AcerCitrixConsenna LtdGoogleHydro66 | Green Cloud Infrastructure (Northern Data), IGEL TechnologyPrime Computer Ltd. and Thoughtify Ltd, this crucial COP 26 supplement also includes opinion pieces from Cristina Figueres, UNFCCC climate champions Nigel Topping and Gonzalo Muñoz Abogabir, UN patron of the oceans Lewis Pugh and climate activist Jonathan Porritt.

Justin notes in his editorial that from a brand perspective, many companies are working not just to offset the issue of greenhouse gas emissions but to actually prevent them. The special edition covers strategic initiatives such as centres powered by renewable energy, recycled plastic laptops, second-use cardboard packaging, low-energy devices and remote working. All of this is hugely positive, and gives all of us the opportunity to take advantage of these innovative approaches to deliver a more sustainable future.

“Computing generates 2.3% of global greenhouse gas emissions due to raw material mining, manufacturing, distribution, electricity consumption and recycling. If somebody said, ‘we only have 50 things to address to save the world’, computing would need to be given a place on that list.”

Justin Sutton-Parker, November 2021

The wide-range of thought-proving topics in this edition cover vital subjects including:

  • Five ways Citrix is helping to advance sustainability
  • How Green IT hardware from Prime Computer can save money and emissions in everyday scenarios
  • How Consenna is supporting the IT Channel will enable sustainability leadership
  • Why IGEL believe ‘displace is the new replace’ when it comes to sustainable IT
  • How Google is working with customers, partners and larger communities to drive sustainability in the tech sector
  • Sustainability strategy drives Acer’s investment and innovation in design, packaging and software
  • Thoughtify on Liberation and isolation: the mental dichotomy of remote working
  • Green gold: a fresh perspective on digital currencies from Hydro66
  • How thinking ‘Px3’ – people, planet and productivity – can help slash IT emissions

You can read the full supplement here: https://www.mygrwww.mygreenpod.com/magazine

If you want to sign up for future editions you can use this link: www.mygreenpod.com/subscribe 

We hope that you enjoy the edition and find inspiration and encouragement from the progress being made by Px3 and our customers in driving forward the vital topic of sustainable IT.

About the Guest Editor: CEO & Research Director: Justin Sutton-Parker, MBA Sustainability & Leadership

Justin Sutton-Parker is an information technology sustainability professional with over 25 years of experience. Nearing completion of a Computer & Urban Science PhD with the University of Warwick, Justin specialises in the impact of IT on global greenhouse gas emissions, highlighting the role IT can play in slowing global warming and tackling climate change.

Justin is co-founder, CEO and Director of research for Px3. He is also the author of multiple pieces of published research and the sustainable information technology columnist for the UK’s leading sustainable and ethical news, products and lifestyle magazine and Guardian supplement “My Green Pod”.

A regular international sustainability speaker, published researcher, consultant and presenter, Justin set out a personal life goal and aim for Px3 to: ‘Remove the greenhouse gas equivalent of 100,000 cars from the atmosphere by 2050 through the diffusion of sustainable IT.’

Email: Justin@px3.org.uk LinkedIn:  Justin Sutton-Parker

Want to Cut Carbon?  Start by Cutting Complexity, Consumption and Cost.

Why we need to move away from technology companies telling us to “buy more stuff” to be green

Rarely does the world of IT look back to the 14th century for advice and guiding principles, but perhaps, in difficult times, it should.  William of Ockham (1287–1347) proposed that when choosing between alternate solutions, the one with the fewest assumptions and components was likely to be the best.  “Occam’s Razor”, sometimes summarised as meaning that the simplest or most obvious answer is most likely to be correct, provides us with some interesting tests for IT sustainability.

How do we strip out the complexity (components, assumptions and greenwash) in favour of simpler solutions that deliver actual, measurable sustainability improvements?

In this post we look at what customers should demand from their strategic partners in terms of actions and commitments, not words.  We also challenge the assumption that those making bold sustainability statements are actually the ones making a difference and provide three areas where a careful check of their credentials may be required.

Complexity, Costs and Carbon

Our first concern should be whether any IT solution adds complexity (through additional infrastructure, management, support and processes) that isn’t balanced by tangible benefits?  Closely linked to the complexity question, does it add cost (through licenses, subscriptions, services and staff costs) that is greater than an alternative and isn’t more than offset by savings elsewhere? 

These are not only fundamental business case questions, they have very real implications for sustainability.  Complexity not only directly increases carbon emissions it makes measuring and reducing them significantly more difficult.  Ever increasing costs swallow budgets that could otherwise be used to promote the use of more sustainable technologies.

IT vendors seeking to sell on green benefits will often stress that their solution enables different ways of working or allows the use of more sustainable technology.  As an example “Cloud” undoubtedly helps to alleviate some of the issues, particularly cloud provided at scale by vendors with verifiable green energy pledges, but not everything purchased on a cloud license is actually hosted and delivered there and not every pledge is as green as it reads.  Complex “hybrid” solutions on the other hand may end up with sustainability compromises around both device choice and infrastructure in less energy efficient on-prem datacentres. 

So the challenge to anyone considering an IT investment should be:  “what do I want to achieve and how else could I do this which would be simpler, with lower cost and lower carbon?” and the challenge to every vendor should be twofold “is what you propose actually the simplest, lowest cost way possible to meet my needs?” and “what steps have you taken to objectively measure and minimise (not just reduce) the carbon footprint of your products and services?”.

The New “C” Word – Consumption

Our second consideration is the fundamental problem with any industry driven by upgrades of which IT is a prime example – that of excessive consumption.  We’re all familiar with urge to have new devices and new functionality.  We’re also aware that if we fail to “keep up” then we face risks.  Perhaps we’ll suddenly be unable to use the apps we depend on.  We may be increasingly vulnerable to security threats such as malware.

The issue is that the constant manufacture, shipping, replacement and disposal of devices creates huge amounts of carbon emissions and e-waste.  So how do we move away from the churn of three to five year replacement cycles and towards something more sustainable? 

The best case for replacement is to get rid of obsolete, inefficient, power-hungry infrastructure. Legacy software remains a progress blocker for many organisations, but technologies now exist which allow problem applications to be run on modern, supported platforms, whether physical or virtual, strengthening the case for moving such workloads to the cloud.

When considering replacement, critical areas to examine are the sustainability of materials sourcing, manufacturing and shipping, together with support for upgrade, repair, re-use and the reclamation / repurposing of components. Cutting consumption applies to energy efficiency when in use, as a new generation of devices enter the market with innovation in processing and battery technology driving lower power consumption and less frequent charging.

The consumption questions for suppliers and partners covers three significant stages; firstly how can you help me extend the life of my device within my organisation by as much as possible?  Secondly, when the device is no longer fit for purpose how can you help me put it to good use elsewhere and finally how can you prove to me that your proposed replacement device is as sustainable and efficient as possible? 

The Three “Ps” – Planet, People and Productivity

Having designed, managed and advised on enterprise IT for over a quarter of a century I may not have quite achieved William of Ockham’s level of historical perspective, but I can share one certainty that has prevailed over all of that period – that effective IT is about a focus on results rather than platforms, technology or product features.

Px3 originally proposed our “three Ps” mission based on Planet, People and Profit to recognise that as part of that “results” equation most organisations needed to balance cost against the other factors, but the third P never sat comfortably with us. 

Firstly there are many organisations which are not driven by a profit motive.  Secondly the drive to maximise profit is exactly the thought process and priority which has caused the global climate issue in the first place.  And finally, perhaps most crucially, while we certainly don’t have an issue with companies making a profit, we cannot put maximising profit on an equal footing with protecting the planet and its people.

On that basis we changed our third P to productivity, recognising that the primary role of green IT should be to enable people to be productive in their role, without damaging the environment unnecessarily to do so.

So our final challenge to IT vendors and service providers would be to check their green credentials at a strategic level – “what are your top five priorities as a business and what genuine, measurable sustainability improvements have you made in the last 12 months?”

Conclusion – Using Science to Clear the Green Fog

At Px3 we’ve undertaken extensive testing of devices from a wide range of vendors and using a variety of operating systems – in fact our research director recently calculated that he had already spent 14,400 hours just on device testing as part of his PhD research into the sustainability.

This has allowed us to identify and quantify opportunities for substantial emissions reductions, by choosing devices designed (and proven) to consume less energy or by using alternative operating systems to ensure that devices last longer.

To be clear – this is genuine, academically validated research carried out for a purpose.  That purpose is to reduce carbon emissions from IT worldwide.  By working with major vendors we can influence priorities and product design.  By working with customers we can help make sustainability part of every procurement decision.

So next time you see sustainability as a marketing message, be sure to check for the genuine science, metrics and actions behind the warm words.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

About the Author: Ewen Anderson BSc, MMS (Dip), CIO @ Px3

Ewen is CIO of Px3, a company on a mission to help organisations balance people, planet and productivity by promoting sustainable IT strategies.  Px3 has set itself the goal of removing the CO2 emissions equivalent of 100,000 cars from our atmosphere by 2050. With a background in psychology, management services, consultancy and enterprise IT, Ewen is a passionate believer that the right technology used in the right way can significantly reduce environmental impacts, engage users and improve productivity.

Ewen (LinkedIn Profile) can be contacted at ewen@px3.org.uk

Measuring the Environmental Impact of “New Normal”

How Hybrid Working saved nearly 2 tonnes of CO2e per person

The latest international research by Px3 CEO Justin Sutton-Parker examined the detailed travel and work patterns of one international technology company, analysing the responses from 815 employees across 24 countries.

It found that that remote working had reduced commuting emissions by 43% in 2019.  In 2020 as the pandemic response was put in place this reduction rose to 97% compared with previous levels. 

Calculating the impact over the two years in the study, the research found that these measures had generated a global greenhouse gas abatement of 1.9 tonnes of CO2e per employee. 

Highlighting the role that IT has to play in enabling emissions reduction, the study noted that the subject company had invested in a Citrix digital workspace solution with zero trust security and threat analytics capabilities.  This “virtual desktop” enabled desktops and applications to be securely accessed on any device from any location.

As such, in 2019, the approach enabled 72% of global employees to work remotely, although only 13% did so five days per week whilst 28% chose to work from the office full time.  Overall the flexible working arrangement was calculated to have resulted in a reduction of 789,331 kgCO2e in scope 3 commuting GHG emissions in 2019.

With the imposition of travel restrictions in 2020 all employees were instructed to work from home for 9 months of the year, leading to a further 75% reduction in commuting emissions.  

The paper also highlighted significant regional differences in concern about the environment.  Overall employees collectively noted a ‘7.5’ score when asked, ‘If 10 is the highest importance, how important to you is reducing your carbon footprint?’, but this was highest in Asia Pacific registering a score of 8.7. In addition the study identified significant differences between regions in terms of both emissions and abatement, as shown below.

The study, from an established authority on sustainable IT and published as part of the 11th International Conference on Sustainable Energy Information Technology 2021, has important implications for sustainability and carbon-zero strategies, highlighting the positive impact that flexible working has already had on the greenhouse gas emissions and proposing some simple changes to build on the momentum.

Overall the findings indicate remote working has now been proved to be feasible for a much wider audience through the enforced business continuity in 2020, and identifies some key factors which must be examined to ensure commuter emissions do not revert or exceed 2019 values.

The focus moving into 2021 as commuting restrictions lift must be upon recognising that IT enabled remote working does support sustainable practices and GHG abatement. As such, the ‘new normal’ should include both an increase on pre COVID-19 home working instances coupled with an adoption of more sustainable transport modes where feasible. These modes should include the natural transition to electric vehicles plus increases in public transport utilisation and zero carbon activities such as cycling.

The results indicate that increasing the average number of remote working days per week and promoting an incremental shift to sustainable transport example can increase the ability for IT to abate GHG emissions by a further 20% to 60%, even in a ‘normal’ year.

Specifically organisations are encouraged to:

  • leverage the benefits of work life balance delivered by remote working,
  • raise awareness of the environmental impact of commuting
  • encourage the adoption of zero carbon transportation for commuting

The conclusion of the research is that whilst employees will begin to return to the office in greater numbers, future abatement of 60% is achievable in the ‘new normal’ when supported by investment in enabling IT solutions.

The published research is available here: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877050921014320

(Photo by JÉSHOOTS from Pexels)

About the Report Author

CEO & Research Director: Justin Sutton-Parker, MBA Sustainability & Leadership  

Justin Sutton-Parker is an information technology sustainability professional with over 25 years of experience. Nearing completion of a Computer & Urban Science PhD with the University of Warwick, Justin specialises in the impact of IT on global greenhouse gas emissions, highlighting the role IT can play in slowing global warming and tackling climate change.

Justin is co-founder, CEO and Director of research for Px3. He is also the author of multiple pieces of published research and the sustainable information technology columnist for the UK’s leading sustainable and ethical news, products and lifestyle magazine and Guardian supplement “My Green Pod”.

A regular international sustainability speaker, published researcher, consultant and presenter, Justin set out a personal life goal and aim for Px3 to: ‘Remove the greenhouse gas equivalent of 100,000 cars from the atmosphere by 2050 through the diffusion of sustainable IT.’

Email: Justin@px3.org.uk LinkedIn:  Justin Sutton-Parker

Is Flexible Working Bad or Good for the Planet, People and Productivity?

There’s something of a debate currently around working from home vs returning to “normal” ways of working, partly sparked by a recent BBC report https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-57339105 predicting a return to a five day week in the office.  In particular, can either the office or the home be held up as the ideal place to work from the perspective of the environment, wellbeing and productivity?  This article will try to take a balanced look at some of the issues and make some suggestions about how to approach the issue.

Let’s start with some context.  Pre-pandemic there were lots of organisations allowing people to work flexibly.  Some of which was allowing staff some days working away from the office, much of it was having about less rigid working hours and then there were some rare conversations about the possibility of measuring performance based on outcomes or added value rather than hours worked. 

Equally there were more traditional organisations that viewed attendance at a particular location between fixed hours as mandatory unless otherwise expressly authorised.  We can term these positions as being “liberal” and “conservative” workplace attitudes with applying any political connotations.

The overall trend, however, was increasingly liberal.  A new generation entering the workforce changed the demographic,  mobile devices proliferated, connectivity improved and flexible working technology generally became more widely adopted.  The pace of change was still relatively was slow until the pandemic struck and suddenly (almost) everyone was a remote worker.  Laptops were in short supply, Zoom became the most used verb in the business lexicon and people actually started using Teams in something like the way it was designed to work.

As vaccination passes the 50% mark for second “jabs” in the UK thoughts are increasingly turning to whether we continue as we are, return to a daily conservative commute or embrace new ways of working.  So let’s take a look at this using the classic Px3 lines of analysis: Planet, People and Productivity.

Planet

The environmental impacts of commuting are well documented, not just in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions but also air quality and pollution.  Pre-pandemic nearly 70% of UK commuting was by car according to Dept of Transport statistics (https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/945829/tsgb-2020.pdf), with an average round trip of an hour.  That’s a huge environmental burden, even with the slow rise in take up of electric vehicles.

On the counter-argument, only 27% of those commuting into London did so by car, demonstrating that if the costs are prohibitive and infrastructure supportive, behaviour will change.  There is also unease about the environmental impacts of large numbers working from home.  Large office spaces are designed and managed to be extremely energy efficient, whereas our individual homes are typically less so.

These objections don’t really stand up to scrutiny, however.  The prospect of significantly reducing the more than 120 billion vehicle miles used each year for commuting and travel for work with public transport is at best unlikely.  The process of replacing all those internal combustion engines with electric (or hydrogen) ones is also too slow to meet our objectives.

As to minimising the emissions from our properties, we already need to address the heating and insulation issues.  We will not reduce overall emissions if we heat our properties, drive to work (leaving them to cool down), consume energy at work, drive home and then re-heat back to a comfortable level.  These are not “either / or” discussions – we need sustainable solutions for the home and workplace.

People

There is also a visible divide with regards to how people feel about a the return to the workplace.  For some this is an age and hierarchy issue – an established generation of leaders and managers inflicting rigid and out-dated working practices on the young.

It’s an emotional topic too, with many stating that the “genie is out of the bottle” and that having had a taste of freedom they would actually rather resign than go back to a standard 9-5 on-premises working day https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-06-01/return-to-office-employees-are-quitting-instead-of-giving-up-work-from-home .

On the plus side for flexible working most people surveyed have felt that flexible working was a positive change for them, saving time, money and reducing their carbon footprint.  Crucially staff working flexibly feel more in control of their lives – better able to balance time spent on exercise, with family, pets and even household tasks that otherwise had to be delayed or missed entirely.

Flexible working also offers the prospect of greater “levelling up” for regions and individuals disadvantaged by a concentration of wealth and opportunity for those willing and able to work in city centres in general and London and the South East specifically.

On the negative side there seems to be no real end to the working day.  All too often time saved from the commute is being diverted back into the working longer hours rather than improving work-life balance. Stress from work no longer has the logical “off switch” of heading out of the office and leaving work behind. As usual technology is stepping in to offer some solutions to turn off the work communication https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/apple-soon-mute-late-night-24272717) but this is simply a filter, not a solution.

The opinion on how much time should be spent in the office makes the divide resurface as well, with 68% of senior execs expressing their wish for staff being present at least 3 days per week to maintain company culture.

Overall it is likely that the divide will continue, but perhaps in different forms.  It may well be that those with skills which are in demand in the emerging new economy will best be able to dictate flexible working packages. It’s also true that new challenger businesses will typically have less of a focus on HQ real estate and fixed working hours.

Productivity

Perhaps the most debated item is whether office working is better for productivity.  Proponents highlight improved teamwork, ad-hoc meetings, chance encounters and “water cooler” moments as significant contributors to innovation and creativity.

Opponents cite the time and cost wasted on travelling, the cost of centralised premises and infrastructure plus the impact on work-life balance when more than ten hours each day is spend working and commuting.

Of course for some the journey to work is also a time to reflect and catch up in a way that going to a desk after breakfast rarely achieves.  The reality of returning to peak-time cramped commuting conditions, gridlocked roads and the frustrations of cancellations and delays make this an unlikely idyl for most.

From a pure productivity perspective, flexible working has potential benefits through more engaged and motivated employees, potentially generating 43% more revenue and delivering 20% more performance than disengaged colleagues – https://www.cipd.co.uk/Images/flexible-working-business-case_tcm18-52768.pdf

The majority of staff in surveys do report being at least as productive away from the office, with about a third reporting increases in effectiveness https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2015/10/20/30-uk-office-workers-are-more-productive-when-work.   

Flatlining productivity is a major issue that has affected the UK since the global financial crisis of 2008, neatly summarised by Andy Haldane, Chief Economist at Bank of England and Chair of the Industrial Strategy Council in his foreword to “Can Good Work Solve the Productivity Puzzle –  https://www.carnegieuktrust.org.uk/publications/can-good-work-solve-the-productivity-puzzle/ – “working better should be our watchword, for therein lies the key to understanding and solving the UK’s productivity crisis”. 

Conclusion

It’s easy to say that the future of work is “hybrid” but that masks the complexity of what we need to consider.  There are good reasons to travel for work and to meet in person, but it’s also a fact that we need to simultaneously reduce our impact on the planet, improve staff engagement and well-being and increase overall productivity.  We will not achieve any of these things by returning to the conservative “status quo” of pre-pandemic 2019.

Hybrid working is likely to  combine HQs’, hub offices, flexible working hours, home working and (hopefully) a more nuanced approach to setting objectives and measuring productivity.  It’s crucial, however, that the organisation has real and up to date information on which to base planning and management activities.  This ranges from user experience, well-being and engagement data for workers to environmental impact assessments on premises, supply chain, IT and travel.

Px3’s recent analysis of ICT and staff travel has identified that some private, public and not-for-profit organisations are actively taking up the challenge.  By using technology to reduce energy consumption, extend device life and enable users to work flexibly and travel less the emissions savings can be considerable (typically up to 70%) and are helping organisations on the journey towards Net Zero.

As one of our customers recently fed back “We presented the Px3 findings at our last climate emergency meeting. It was the first time IT had such detailed information about our carbon footprint and a clear roadmap for the future.”

We need to celebrate this and build on these strategies and science-based metrics to properly identify where we are and where we can get to in order to meet our sustainability goals, our responsibility to the workforce and take advantage of the new opportunities that will arise.

(Photo by Tima Miroshnichenko from Pexels)

About the Author: Ewen Anderson BSc, MMS (Dip), CIO @ Px3

Ewen is CIO of Px3, a company on a mission to help organisations balance people, planet and productivity by promoting sustainable IT strategies.  Px3 has set itself the goal of removing the CO2 emissions equivalent of 100,000 cars from our atmosphere by 2050. With a background in psychology, management services, consultancy and enterprise IT, Ewen is a passionate believer that the right technology used in the right way can significantly reduce environmental impacts, engage users and improve productivity.

Ewen (LinkedIn Profile) can be contacted at ewen@px3.org.uk

An icon for our times? Why Professor Pat Pending is Px3’s All-Time Cartoon hero.

Taking a lighter note, we consider the remarkable talents of our favourite cartoon hero, Professor Pat Pending from Wacky Races – a true icon of what science and scientists can do for us in limiting the effects of climate change.

The three “P”s in Px3 officially stand for Planet, People and Productivity.  But is there something  else they might represent?  Perhaps there is one truly appropriate alternative – Px3’s very own hero – Professor Pat Pending.   For younger readers I should explain that Prof Pending was a racing-driver scientist who drove his Convert-a-Car in the 1960s comedy cartoon series “Wacky Races”, inspired by the 1965 comedy film The Great Race.

Pat Pending used his scientific prowess to create a boat shaped vehicle which could transform into a multitude of shapes and functions.  The more sensible of these were a vehicles such as a motorbike, tandem, hot air balloon and a jet car but also included were a flying carpet on wheels, a forklift, an arrow and a bowling ball.

Like many from the genre the cartoon now fails pretty much every diversity test, not least in having an all-white cast (with possible the exception of “Little Gruesome” who for some reason was purple) and just a single female character who was naturally obsessed with applying her make-up while driving. 

So why is Professor Pat Pending such a hero to us? 

http://www.freepik.com">Designed by brgfx / FreepikWell our 3 x ‘P’s has 3 ‘A’s we very much admire….

Appliance (of Science) – Firstly his achievements are an excellent example of applying science to overcome practical (if comic) problems.  As set out in his recent book https://time.com/5930098/bill-gates-climate-change/ Bill Gates stresses the need for investment in scientific innovation to help tackle climate change. While we need to approach scientific interventions to tackle climate change with care (see here for a cautionary view https://www.theguardian.com/books/2021/mar/06/it-is-the-question-of-the-century-will-tech-solve-the-climate-crisis-or-make-it-worse) there is undoubtedly a requirement and role for practical, innovative climate science in our near future.

Altruism – Secondly his amazing gadgets and inventions were often used not just to boost his own speed but also to help other drivers who had fallen victim to the machinations of series villain, Dick Dastardly.  If there’s one thing the covid-19 pandemic should be teaching us it’s that the issues we face are global and that none of us are safe until all of us are safe.  Here’s a retrospective on that topic from Fijian Prime Minister and COP23 President Frank Bainimarama: https://cop23.com.fj/we-must-do-everything-in-our-power-to-meet-the-challenge-posed-by-climate-change-cop-presidents-speech-for-20th-conference-of-commonwealth-education-ministers/

Attitude – Finally we admire his attitude and optimism.  There is no problem his ingenuity and inventiveness can’t overcome and no tricky situation he will shy away from.  Whether it’s rescuing Penelope Pitstop on his tandem or cueing boulders back through the caverns of Carlsbad, he’s up for the challenge.  In the coming years (and starting right now) we need to cultivate positive, targeted action plans to deliver on the promises and commitments already made but not delivered.  Attitude is a critical part of this, as discussed in another article: https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/blog/internal-attitudes-climate-change-matter.

In conclusion we’re certain the Professor would be a huge supporter of transparent reporting against science-based targets (https://www.wri.org/initiatives/science-based-targets) as a way to measure and accelerate our progress towards the winning line of the UN and IPCC goals.  And while we may not have quite his array of gadgets and gizmos, Px3 is proud to bring our own touch of science to the sustainability proceedings. 

For combining humour and technology for the good of others, we salute you Professor!

(For the record, Professor Pat Pending came first in three Wacky Races episodes; the ‘Mish-Mash Missouri Bash’, ‘Eeny, Miny Missouri Go!’ and, controversially given the topic, ‘Oils Well That Ends Well’!)

(Desert image designed by brgfx / Freepik)

About the Author: Ewen Anderson BSc, MMS (Dip), CIO @ Px3

Ewen is CIO of Px3, a company on a mission to help organisations balance people, planet and productivity by promoting sustainable IT strategies.  Px3 has set itself the goal of removing the CO2 emissions equivalent of 100,000 cars from our atmosphere by 2050. With a background in psychology, management services, consultancy and enterprise IT, Ewen is a passionate believer that the right technology used in the right way can significantly reduce environmental impacts, engage users and improve productivity.

Ewen (LinkedIn Profile) can be contacted at ewen@px3.org.uk

Px3 Analysis Leaps Past the ½ Million Device Mark

Recent projects for central government, manufacturing and not-for profit clients have seen Px3’s tally of device emissions analysed increase dramatically. With sustainability once again firmly at the top of the news agenda, we take a moment to recognise passing a significant milestone on our sustainability journey.

With the final reports issued on our three most recent projects Px3 has now completed sustainability analysis and reporting on an end user computing estate totalling more than 620,000 devices.

Uptake in sustainability analysis has been particularly strong in the last few months and 2021 looks like being the year that sustainability makes it to the top of the business agenda, at least in those parts of the world where the pandemic is receding.

Not surprising considering that our analysis has identified over 3,500 metric tonnes of GHG emissions just from these EUC devices.  Once you add in commuting and business travel (as people return to workplaces and face to face meetings), on-premises datacentres and the issues around device disposal and e-waste, the environmental impacts are clear and the need for action urgent.

Our approach of bringing science-based measurement to drive sustainable decision making is crucial.  We need action from organisations at board-level to drive change – and board-level decisions demand independent analysis and verifiable data.

The increasing scale and scope of projects has also required significant upgrades to our modelling tools and reporting, with customers responding that the new dashboards and resulting analysis is “eye-opening”.  

This year we’ve also updated our demo capabilities to allow customers to see the sort of reports they can expect.  We’re also working on a cloud-version of our models which will give customers unlimited on-line access to all their granular data including filters, reports and sustainability metrics.

Want to know more? Just contact us for a demonstration and introductory workshop.

About the Author: Ewen Anderson BSc, MMS (Dip), CIO @ Px3

Ewen is CIO of Px3, a company on a mission to help organisations balance people, planet and productivity by promoting sustainable IT strategies.  Px3 has set itself the goal of removing the CO2 emissions equivalent of 100,000 cars from our atmosphere by 2050. With a background in psychology, management services, consultancy and enterprise IT, Ewen is a passionate believer that the right technology used in the right way can significantly reduce environmental impacts, engage users and improve productivity.

Ewen (LinkedIn Profile) can be contacted at ewen@px3.org.uk